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Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden

Purple Perennials

As powerful color as this, purple takes center stage in the world of garden design with its intensity and boldness. Recognizing this value, the Pantone Color Institute announced Ultraviolet as the color of the year highlighting its connection to non-conformism and creative excellence. As for us, here in the garden, we turn our attention to the mighty Purple Perennials, a kinglike flower of power and bravado.

The Allure of Purple Perennials

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Unveiling the Spectrum

If you like purple flowers, you’ll be glad to know there are lots of types that come back every year. You can find purple flowers that stay close to the ground or grow tall, perfect for any garden. We’ve put together a list of these flowers by how tall they get, so you can find the right ones for your garden easily.

Tall Purple Perennials

1. Phlox

Phlox-paniculata Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Phlox paniculata

Garden phlox is a favorite flower that reaches 2 to 3 feet in height. One type of flower that flourishes in sunny locations is phlox. It grows a lot of ball-like little flowers. They can be blue or purple Phlox is a plant that does well over many years, and is quite tough. They grow well despite deer eating them. This happens during mid-summer and in the fall seasons. New flowers will develop if you remove the old ones. Many insects visiting phlox’s flowers are attracted by its beautiful nectar, butterflies, bees, and such large moths.

2 Vervain

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Verbena stricta

If you’re looking for plants from North America that come back every year, vervain is a good choice. It grows 4 to 5 feet tall with eye-catching purple flowers. Even though it’s hard to find in plant stores, you can grow it from seeds. Deer don’t usually eat it, and local bees love it. Vervain brings a nice tall look to gardens.

3. German Bearded Iris

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Verbena stricta Iris germanica

The German bearded iris is a beautiful flower that comes in purple colors. It likes sunny spots and can grow 2 to 3 feet high. These flowers are strong and they bloom in early spring, showing off nature’s beauty.

Check out July Birth Flowers and Their Meanings

4. Bear’s Breeches

Bears-Breeches-683x1024 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Acanthus mollis

If you’re looking for a tall, noticeable plant, bear’s breeches are a good choice. They grow to about 3 feet with spiky leaves and flowers that enjoy sunshine and bloom for a long time. They can survive very cold weather, down to -20 degrees F, and they make your garden beautiful without being eaten by deer or rabbits.

5. Monkshood

Purple-Monkshood Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Aconitum napellus or A. carmichaelli

A late-blooming marvel, monkshood graces gardens with tall spires of flowers from late summer to autumn. Requiring full sun, this -40 degrees F hardy perennial reaches 3 to 4 feet. Caution is warranted due to its poisonous nature, offering an additional layer of deer resistance.

6. Tatarian Aster

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Aster tataricus

In the realm of tall purple perennials, Tatarian aster stands at a majestic 6 feet, a beacon for migrating monarchs. With clusters of small, pale purple flowers, it thrives in full sun, requiring no staking for support. Hardy to -40 degrees F, its late blooms attract a multitude of pollinators, making it a must-have in any garden.

Check out Which 10 Perennial Flowers Bloom All Summer

7. False Indigo

Purple-False-Indigo-683x1024 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Baptisia australis

When spring starts, a plant known as false indigo shows off its purple-blue flowers. It can reach a height of 3 feet in sunny areas. Deer won’t bother it, and it can handle the cold very well, even temperatures down to -40 degrees Fahrenheit. Even though the flowers are short-lived, the plant’s leaves are still attractive.

8. Russell Blue Lupine

Russell-Blue-Lupine Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Lupinus ‘Russell Blue

Even with tough, acidic soil, the ‘Russell Blue’ lupine flowers grow well. They bloom in late spring and deer won’t eat them. They’re hardy enough to survive winters as cold as -30 degrees Fahrenheit and their tall purple flowers stay pretty for a long time, making gardens look great.

Medium Height Purple Perennials

9. Clustered Bellflower

Campanula-glomerata Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Campanula glomerata

The Clustered Bellflower stands out in gardens with its dark purple flowers. It does well in full sun or partial shade and can handle extreme cold, up to -40 degrees Fahrenheit. It blooms all through summer, attracting bees and butterflies. By taking off old flowers, you can make sure it keep showing its lovely blooms.

10. Blazing Star

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Liatris spicata

Blazing stars are plants from North America that bees and butterflies love because of their tall flower spikes that grow up to 12 inches. They like to be in the sun and have flowers for a long time, which makes them look good and great for picking. They’re tough plants that can survive winter cold down to -40 degrees Fahrenheit.

11. Salvia

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Salvia officinalis

Salvia is a plant with slim flower spikes that grows well in hot, sunny spots that don’t get much water. It flowers all summer long and deer don’t like to eat it. It reaches up to 18 inches tall. The ‘Cardonna’ and ‘Amethyst’ types make the garden full of purple, and ‘May Night’ is a favorite. Salvia can handle cold down to -30 degrees Fahrenheit and is often planted in gardens.

12. Anise Hyssop

Anise-Hyssop Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Agastache foeniculum ‘Blue Fortune’

Anise Hyssop is popular with bees and butterflies due to its big spikes of light purple flowers. It’s a plant that deer avoid, and it keeps flowering for a long time. It grows well in lots of sun and can also do okay in some shade. Trimming the plant down a bit in late May will help it produce more flowers. It’s a good choice for gardens because it can handle cold up to -20 degrees Fahrenheit and it smells sweet, like licorice.

13. Mistflower

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Conoclinium coelestinum

Resembling ageratum but with a perennial twist, mistflower unveils powder puff-like blooms late in the season. Fully hardy down to -20 degrees F, it spreads prolifically in full sun to partial shade. With a height of 1 foot, this moderately deer-resistant perennial adds a touch of late-season magic to the garden.

14. Spike Speedwell

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden

Botanical Name : Veronica spicata

Spike speedwell is a classic garden plant with sharp-looking spikes full of purple flowers. It doesn’t get sick with powdery mildew easily, especially the ‘Royal Candles’ type. It can survive very cold weather, down to -40 degrees Fahrenheit, and its flowers last for many weeks. At about 12 inches tall, it’s a plant that shows the lasting beauty of gardens.

15. Pikes Peak Beardstongue

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Penstemon x mexicali ‘Pikes Peak Purple’

The ‘Pikes Peak Purple’ beardstongue is a flower that’s good for bees and can live through cold down to -20 degrees Fahrenheit. It has tube-like flowers, grows well in sunny places with dry soil, and its purple flowers make you think of a garden full of bees.

16. Wood Phlox

 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden

Botanical Name : Phlox divaricata

Wood phlox is a little plant that loves the shade and flowers early, just like tulips do. It’s from the woods in eastern North America and has light purple flowers in bunches. It can survive really cold weather, even as cold as -40 degrees Fahrenheit, and deer or dry soil don’t bother it. It’s a good plant for the darker parts of your garden.

17. Purple-Leaved Spiderwort

Tradescantia-pallida-‘Purple-Queen-1024x683 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Tradescantia pallida ‘Purple Queen

The ‘Purple Queen’ is known for its small lavender flowers, but the real beauty is in its purple leaves. It’s a plant that does well in hot places and is about 12 inches tall. It looks stunning as it hangs over pots and walls, making any garden look majestic.

18. Lalla Aster

Symphyotrichum-1024x768 Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden
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Botanical Name : Symphyotrichum x ‘Lalla’

Lalla aster is a type of flower That blooms in purple and white It grows in North America And attracts many pollinators,It likes the sun and well-drained soil, It has a sweet and fragrant smell

Check out 15 Long Blooming Perennials That Flower All Summer Long

In simple terms, you can find many purple flowers that bloom again every season, perfect for garden enthusiasts. They vary in height, and each brings its special color and form to the garden. If you enjoy the stunning phlox or the delightful anise hyssop, these flowers showcase nature’s beauty. Planting them can make your garden a beautiful place that continues to impress throughout the year.

2 thoughts on “Purple Perennials: The Stars of the Garden”

  1. Pingback: Forget Me Nots Care: A Comprehensive Guide - Gardener's School

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